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Youth Offender Public Management Model

In Rounds One and Two of the Youth Offender Demonstration Project, the Employment and Training Administration tested a range of service delivery strategies within a diverse set of communities in order to identify effective institutional and organizational approaches that other communities could use to help youth offenders, youth gang members, and youth at risk of court or gang involvement. Specifically, ETA identified four elements that, taken together, constitute DOL's "organizational footprint" for effective practices: the Youth Offender Public Management Model for State and Local Workforce Services. Sites that offered richer employability services and increased employment to youth offenders and youth at risk of court or gang involvement appear to have included all four components of this model. The four model components include:

Youth Offender
Public Management Model for State and Local Workforce Agencies

Organizational Attributes
Diagram
Reentry Services Data Collection and Analysis

Model Component 1: Organizational Attributes.
In the first round of the Youth Offender Demonstration, evaluators found a number of organizational attributes that were shared among the demonstration projects that were most successfully implemented, provided richer employability services and increased employment for youth offenders, gang members, and at-risk youth. Round Three Youth Offender Demonstration sites should incorporate each of these organizational attributes, as described below:

Create a Well-Conceived Plan:
  • Program has a clear and focused vision and mission.
  • Program goals and objectives are realistic and measurable.
  • Stakeholders, including community partners, family member representatives, and front-line staff, are involved during program development and implementation.
Establish Partnership with the Juvenile Justice and Health Care Systems:
  • Grantee is experienced in working with the Juvenile Justice and Health Care systems.
Collect and Maintain Data:
  • A system for collecting and reporting program information is utilized.
Build Community Support/Network:
  • Youth and family serving agencies including community- and faith-based organizations and public service agencies support program.
Ensure Grantee Involvement:
  • Grantee is the lead agency, actively providing direction and coordination for the project.
  • Grantee involvement and support is continuous.
Connect Workforce Development, Juvenile Justice, and Health Care Systems:
  • Grantee coordinates with and utilizes resources available through the Workforce Development, Juvenile Justice, and Health Care Systems.
Leverage Resources through Collaboration and Partnerships:
  • Project effectively identifies and utilizes other resources and funding streams to support project goals.
Strive for Continuous Improvement:
  • Project conducts self-assessment and actively seeks and accepts available technical assistance.
Share Leadership and Information:
  • Decision-making and information is shared with stakeholders.

Model Component 2: Reentry Services.
In addition to having the effective organizational attributes identified above, successful Youth Offender Demonstration Project sites provide key reentry services in order to fully integrate youth offenders, gang members, and at-risk youth into their communities. They include:

  1. Alternative sentencing and community service;
  2. Gang prevention initiatives;
  3. Aftercare services; and
  4. Route counseling (i.e., case management).

Model Component 3: Workforce Development Services.
The third component of the Youth Offender Public Management Model is a set of Workforce Development Services. While these services are provided within the parameters of the local One-Stop delivery system, they should be tailored to meet the specific needs of youth offenders, gang members, and at-risk youth.

Model Component 4: Data Collection and Analysis. The fourth and final element of the Youth Offender Public Management Model is data-centered and completes the continuous improvement loop inherent in the model. In initial rounds of the Youth Offender Demonstration, data collection and analysis have proven to be crucial in aiding the measurement of project accomplishment, promoting effective administration within sites, and strengthening the sustainability of youth offender projects.

Round Three sites are expected to collect and report data for two age groups (i.e., 14-17 and 18-24 year olds) and to record them separately for two separate status categories (i.e., youth offenders and at-risk youth). These data elements include (see attachment for detailed explanation of required data elements):

  • Number recruited
  • Number enrolled (broken down by gender and race)
  • Number in federally funded job training
  • Number in other job training
  • Entered apprenticeship
  • Total in-school
  • Number in High School
  • Number in College
  • Number involved in GED preparation
  • Total out-of-school
  • Number in subsidized employment
  • Number in unsubsidized employment
  • Total employed
  • Number enlisted in military
  • Number in aftercare programs
  • Number entered community service
  • Number receiving other services
  • Number convicted of a crime
  • Number incarcerated

Finally, these public management components are organized around a project-specific menu of workforce services that is strategically tailored to meet the specific needs of their own participant populations and communities.

ETA hypothesizes that these four components taken together form a continuous improvement loops that comprises the public management model. This model has been effective in those sites that provided richer employability services and increased employment to youth offenders and youth at risk of court or gang involvement.